How To Encourage Children To Be Creative

How To Encourage Children To Be Creative

*this is a guest post. The artwork featured above is by my amazingly talented little brother, Ned! He’s currently working on his art GCSE.

If you have kids or have young children in the family, then why not try to get them interested in creative pursuits like drawing, writing, and playing musical instruments? Young kids can be particularly impressionable, so if you tell them you think being creative is “cool” and “fun,” then there’s a good chance you’ll be able to spark a fire in them. It’s a good idea to try and foster creativity in children as it’s widely accepted to help them gain a better grasp of problem-solving, innovative thought, and a will to explore new and unfamiliar places. Not to mention, the ability to interact with others and think independently for themselves. So, how can you encourage these vital skills?

Choose A Great School

Children are continually learning, and their parents or guardians are their sole educators until they reach the ages of around three or four. At this age, they start to attend nursery and school and teachers and learning assistants begin to impart wisdom. By this point, they should already have some understanding of self-expression through using paints and chalks and talking with others. Try and give them the best start, and conduct some thorough research into which schools look as though they will offer the education you want your kids to receive. You could consider enrolling your child in Glenesk School, Surrey if you’re looking for new facilities, inspiration and passionate teaching specialists, and all around academic excellence.

Respect Individuality

If the children you’re taking care of show absolutely no interest in art and music, and would rather do something else like watch television or play football with their friends, then be sure to encourage them. If they’re keen to watch children’s shows, then let them have their fun up to a point, and gently persuade them to watch a documentary on wild animals like bears, big cats, and whales, for example. Try to educate them on a wide range of topics.

Inspire Them

If you’re particularly well versed in a skill, whatever it may be, then show your kids and encourage them to play along. If you enjoy creating art yourself, then let kids take their turn and get their hands dirty with watercolours, pastels, charcoals, and chalks, for example. If they begin to show interest in wanting to pursue something creative, then why not book tickets to music shows, theatre performances, and take a Saturday afternoon to wander around local art galleries.

Get Out In Nature

Make sure they get out from beyond the confines of their bedrooms walls if you want them to benefit from being creative. You need to immerse them in interesting things to do, like walking and hiking (and taking a picnic), cycling, rollerblading, reading, and going to visit your adult friends. If you can keep them busy without exhausting them, then you’re on the right lines. Nature is a great starting place as it’s a free activity that all the family can enjoy, even the dog. Taking kids out walking into the countryside gets them looking at trees, and birds, and even maps in some cases. It’s also a wonderful source of exercise that’s low impact and has many cardiovascular benefits.

Thanks for reading,
Emily